05 April 2017

DLA Piper continues LatAm expansion in deal with Peruvian firm

DLA Piper LLP (US) has established a cooperation agreement with Peruvian firm Pizarro, Botto & Escobar Abogados in its latest LatAm expansion move. Together the firms will operate as DLA Piper Pizarro Botto Escobar.

Pizarro, Botto & Escobar, based in Lima, Peru, is a multidisciplinary firm with more than 40 lawyers working across a wide range of industries. The cooperation agreement provides DLA Piper with a firm partner with a strong reputation and extensive knowledge in the practice areas of M&A and corporate, banking and finance, projects and infrastructure, insurance, tax, arbitration and litigation, employment, intellectual property, real estate, energy and, recently, corporate criminal and compliance matters.

Latest LatAm expansion

In December 2016, DLA Piper announced its cooperation agreement with Bahamondez, Alvarez & Zegers in Chile. That followed the opening of an office in San Juan, Puerto Rico; a cooperation agreement with Martinez Beltran in Colombia; and the establishment of DLA Piper Gallastegui y Lozano in Mexico. This is in addition to the firm's cooperation agreement with Campos Mello in Brazil.

Highly regarded

‘Pizarro, Botto & Escobar has wide credibility and is highly regarded in Peru and throughout Latin America," said Roger Meltzer, DLA Piper’s global co-chairman and co-chairman of the Americas. ‘We now have a presence in five of Latin America's largest economies, reflecting our investment philosophy in executing a pan-hemispheric strategy through the expansion of our regional network.’

Commitment to LatAm

‘DLA Piper's commitment to Latin America is significant and growing, which is part of the reason we’re excited to call the firm our partner,’ said Luis Pizarro, managing partner of Pizarro, Botto & Escobar. Juan Picon, DLA Piper's global co-chairman and co-chairman of the Latin America practice, added: ‘This is a great opportunity for our global platform at a time where investments from Europe and China are growing in Latin America, which complements our hemispheric approach.’